Tagged: meetings

Shaking up Meeting Structures

Editable vector silhouettes of skeletons in an office as a failed business concept

I have spent a lot of time thinking, reading and talking about how to improve professional development and meeting structures. The early focus was in considering how to make meetings meaningful and productive, where everyone’s input was essential. Since that time I have endeavoured to develop structures and models that ensure that all required time together, whether that be professional learning of the entire staff or small team meetings, be essential to all those involved.

Last year, as Deputy with oversight of curriculum and PD, I knew that not only did I want to rethink the structures that support our student learning (stay tuned post to come), but I also wanted to rethink the structures that define our staff learning. Fortunately, I work in a school where the leadership team are open to approaching things differently.

This led me to think about what needs our previous formats fulfilled and whether they reflect the significant changes in the way we collaborate as professionals today. My conclusion was that in a transparent and open environment, where ongoing communication, feedback and input is fostered, the formal meeting procedures are not necessary.

Our meeting structures were very typical of most schools. Our whole staff meetings were structured by an agenda and run by a chair, with minutes taken. The agenda was dominated by the delivery of information with intermittent opportunities for staff to provide input. Predominantly the information was relevant to most but not all, sometimes, only relevant to a few. Staff were generally accepting and compliant of being talked at, however, this was completely in contradiction to the discourse we aspired to promote in classrooms. Our school’s vision is driven by developing creative, vibrant and resilient learners guided by knowledgeable, innovative and passionate staff. These meetings were certainly none of these things as a standard.

I may be being extremely critical here because having recently sat in a very traditional and boring meeting run by an external facilitator outside of education, I know that as a school we have come a long way in our structures that relate to PD and meetings. Continuous development and growth can go unnoticed, and I know that others who come into our structures are surprised by the way we facilitate staff collaboration.

Nevertheless, by the first term break of last year, I was already frustrated by the manner in which we were continuing to conduct our meetings and professional development, and ultimately I am the one responsible.meetingSo hand in hand with the opportunity to shake up our teaching timetable structure came the opportunity to shake up how we come together and collaborate as staff.

My experience in schools has been staff meetings and professional development occurring at the end of the day. Personally, as a participant in PD or meetings, the end of the day was always a challenge. I had a growing pile of emails and marking, not to mention I was fatigued from a day of work. If I learnt a strategy or approach in a PD session I had no opportunity to put it into action immediately as my teaching day had ended.  My energy was low and I was less likely to contribute as energetically or spend any time reflecting on how the PD was relevant to my practice.  As a facilitator of PD or convener of meetings, I was always conscious that others involved potentially felt similar. I would try to streamline the meeting structure as much as possible, not to keep people longer than necessary, and I would try and facilitate PD that was meaningful and interactive with a range of success.

So what did I do about it?

Initially, I looked at what we had historically used meetings for and I asked questions about the purpose of these meetings.

  1. Can the information be communicated in a different way?
  2. Is the information necessary for all stakeholders?
  3. Do staff have the opportunity to contribute and how is that possible with over 80 people involved?
  4. How long do meetings need to be?
  5. What happens when critical information needs to be shared but doesn’t align with meeting days?

This resulted in 5 aspects that I wanted to drive the structure of meetings.

  1. More personalised, only those who are invested or required need attend
  2. When it can be communicated in a memo or email, then so be it
  3. Keep gatherings short and targeted so that there is no time to waffle or waste time – so short that people can stand during the meeting
  4. Utilise the morning when staff are alert & can immediately act, or put strategies/learning into practice
  5. Allow flexibility for staff to schedule time for their own collaboration with peers

As a firm believer in the power of language, I also knew that in changing any structure, I had to think about how the terms we used would inform a change in approach. I considered how language often dictates our expectations. If we have only experienced meetings in traditional ways, then we tend to expect the same. So “huddles” became the word I used to describe how the new approach could work. Huddles for me implied short urgent periods of time when teams come together to share critical information or make collaborative decisions that are relevant to everyone in the huddle (my basketball background influence).

What eventuated?

Whole staff after school meetings were eliminated.

Morning Huddles were introduced: a maximum of 30 minutes starting at 8:30am and scheduled via our Learner Management System (Daymap) so that all staff can see scheduled times on their teaching calendar. Huddles could be used for whole staff quick touch base, teaching teams, year level teams, quick PD, PLC’s, professional practice, committee and action group planning – pretty much anything that means bringing a group together to collaborate.

Three weeks in, there has been a range of positive feedback from staff. No after school long, drawn out meetings has meant that staff are free to utilise their afternoons to work in their teaching teams to plan and design or even to go home!

This time last year, whole staff were scheduled to have spent up to 480 minutes together in whole staff or Learning Area meetings. This year staff have spent up to 390 minutes in required sessions which have mostly been Professional Development. So already in the first three weeks of school, staff have gained an hour and a half more to utilise for their benefit.

What have I noticed?

I have seen more staff choosing to use their afternoons to catch up with their peers to program and design learning and I have seen five optional Professional Development Huddles offered (in just 3 weeks) in the morning with fantastic staff buy-in.  These have included Google Apps, designing and using flexible learning spaces and strategies to facilitate responsible behaviours. Previously optional sessions run at lunch times, before or after school would attract minimal staff, which is always discouraging.  

Time will tell if these structural changes facilitate the professional practice we aspire to achieve, but so far so good!

Making the Meeting Productive

Boring

cc licensed ( BY NC ) flickr photo by Cheryl Colan

With our differentiation focus at school, we set about to establish criteria to ensure all curriculum planning involved specific elements to guarantee student learning objectives were at the centre. One of the offshoots of this process was the realisation that our curriculum planning time in faculties was very limited and meeting structures needed some/a lot of adjustment to make them more productive.

With this brought to light, I looked at my own faculty, how we spend our time and how we could streamline it to make it more effective. We made two adjustments which have led to great improvement and less time wasted!

1. Developing an agenda that requires action!

My first focus was to ensure we had something to show. What was our aim and what was it we wanted to get from our time together. This led to establishing a requirement for our meetings; that items on the agenda must be related to:

  • curriculum planning
  • relationship building
  • professional development or
  • problem solving and decision making

Each item on the agenda required a solution, an action or a product by the end of the staff meeting. These could include; curriculum design, developing responses to behaviour, organising excursions, timetable changes or looking at technology implementation.

Here is our Unit Agenda from our last meeting.

You will also notice at the very bottom, an expectation that staff bring ‘materials’ or complete ‘preparation’.

2. Eliminating announcements!

Developing a shared “notice board” meant that announcements were kept for reading prior to the meeting and precious time was not wasted broadcasting information. Initially this led to addressing only queries or questions during meeting time.

Recently we have taken this one step further. We share our notices (and everything else) on Google Docs so we established a space underneath for questions or clarifications.  This enables us to address these in real time, prior to meetings to again ensure we use our time more productively.

These two simple changes have meant that our meetings always have something to show at the end. It relies on a level of professional practice with an expectation that everyone reads both the notices and the agenda. We still do share information via email, text and of course face to face, but having these two documents ensure we maintain communication and utilise our collaborative time better.